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Norman Dennis Schussler Jan 5 1919 – April 5 2012

April 12, 2012 Obituaries No Comments

He moved to Fox Hill Farm in Columbia, CT in 1951, where he farmed, and he later taught woodworking at Manchester High School. He loved the land and he loved walking the farm he carefully preserved.

Norman D. Schussler of Columbia, CT died Thursday, April 5 at the age of 93.

Born in Chase City, Virginia, he was raised in Richmond, Virginia and the Bronx (New York).

After serving with the Thirteenth Air Force in the Solomon Islands and the Philippines during World War II, he was discharged in 1946 with the rank of Major.  That same year he met his future wife, Caroline, at a Passover Seder.

He moved to Fox Hill Farm in Columbia, CT in 1951, where he farmed, and he later taught woodworking at Manchester High School.  He loved the land and he loved walking the farm he carefully preserved.

He was devoted to his wife and children.

After studying pewter smithing with Frances Felton and enameling with Margaret Seeler, he collaborated with them on the Norwich Cross at the Church of the Redeemer, Norwich, CT.

He also served on the Columbia Charter Revision Commission and on the Columbia Wetlands Commission for many years.

He is survived by Caroline, his wife of 65 years, children Susan and Michael of New York City, and sister Ellen Drori of San Francisco, CA.

Arrangements are private and handled by Potter Funeral Home, Willimantic, CT.  In lieu of flowers, the family requests that you send contributions to the Columbia Volunteer Fire Department, P.O. Box 26, Columbia, CT. 06237.

Posted April 12, 2012

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CL-P to trim trees in Columbia this week

April 12, 2012 Local News No Comments

In an effort to reduce the number of tree-related power outages and improve reliability for its customers, Connecticut Light & Power is in the process of trimming trees around power lines in Columbia and Lebanon.

The work will cost the company $200,000.

Affected streets can be found on the web site www.clpbringspower.com and clicking on the link that says “Vegetation Management.”

Residents with questions can contact Mark Chandler of Lucas Tree Experts at (603) 560-0565 or Steve Child at CL&P at (860) 665-6165.

Posted April 12, 2012

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Columbia building official faces termination

April 12, 2012 Local News No Comments

The Board of Selectmen had scheduled a termination hearing Tuesday (April 10) at a special meeting, but it was cancelled at the last minute. When asked why, Columbia First Selectmen Carmen Vance said “there was another incident,” and declined to provide details.

A town employee with a long history of disciplinary issues in Columbia faces possible termination, a decision expected to be made soon by the Board of Selectmen.

Alvan Hill, the town’s building official, started his position in Columbia in June 1999. His disciplinary issues in Columbia date back to at least August 2004, according to town officials.

An April 4, 2012 letter written by Town Administrator Jonathan Luiz to Hill addresses the most recent incident – it accuses Hill of claiming (and receiving) sick time pay from Columbia in February, time Luiz said Hill spent working for the Town of Ellington. Hill currently earns $32.60 per hour, and works 15 hours per week in Columbia.

According to an employee in Ellington’s human resources office,  Hill filled in for the full-­time building official there, Peter Williams. Hill worked there for two days a week for two weeks, she said.

Luiz said Hill’s union representative and Columbia Finance Director Beverly Ciurylo met with Hill on March 21 to discuss this incident.

Luiz states that Hill notified town staff on Feb. 21 that he would be unable to come to work the next morning because he was sick.

Luiz states that Hill later admitted he accepted an offer to work in Ellington that day.

In his April 4 letter, Luiz states:

“You did not acknowledge any wrongdoing for working for the Town of Ellington on a day that you had called in sick to the Town of Columbia… Rather, you said that you would have been better served by claiming a vacation day on February 22, 2012 instead of having put in for a sick day.

“I believe that you falsified your Town of Columbia timecard for the week of February 20, 2012, and that such falsification constitutes an act of theft against the Town of Columbia.”

Hill could not be reached for comment this morning and his administrative assistant, Cindee Hodge, declined to comment.

The Board of Selectmen had scheduled a termination hearing Tuesday (April 10) at a special meeting, but it was cancelled at the last minute. When asked why, Columbia First Selectmen Carmen Vance said “there was another incident,” and declined to provide details.

Vance, who has served as first selectmen since 2009, has been on the board since 2003 and has been involved in many of the disciplinary actions against Hill.

Luiz, who has been working in Columbia since 2008, has also disciplined Hill on numerous occasions.

Luiz said he expects the meeting to be rescheduled for a date in May and that before it is scheduled, Hill will meet with Luiz.

Per state statutes, Hill will have the opportunity to defend himself at that time, whether by himself or through legal counsel.

Selectmen also are expected to consider all other disciplinary issues Hill Luiz said he has had while working in town. Luiz declined to comment on why Hill was not fired for any of those incidents.

On May 5, 2011, Luiz sent Hill a letter claiming he failed to follow state building codes with respect to a building project at 112 Pine St.

According to Luiz, Hill issued a building permit for 112 Pine St. for a beam and closet rebuild.

Luiz states that he later discovered the construction work was much more extensive than what was covered by the permit. He said a full house renovation was done, including interior and exterior work.

Luiz said Hill should have required the applicant to resubmit plans to the town based on the actual level of construction.

At that time, Hill was issued a three-day “working suspension” in May 2011, meaning an employee still reports for work during that period, with pay, but the incident is reflected in the employee’s disciplinary record.

Luiz said this disciplinary action is used when there is no one else to fill in for the employee.

Previously, on Feb 23, 2011, Luiz sent Hill a letter regarding his failure to follow state building codes with respect to activity at 5 Homestead Lane. He was suspended for one day without pay for this incident.

Luiz said Hill issued a building permit to the owner/ applicant without required written approval from the Eastern Highlands Health District indicating the existing sewage system was satisfactory.

Luiz said Hill also approved a certificate of occupancy for construction that was not in compliance with the approved construction documents, and Hill failed to mandate the owner/applicant resubmit for town approval an amended set of construction documents.

Posted April 12, 2012 as edited by HTNP.com Editor Brenda Sullivan

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A slam dunk for Storrs Center, Geno Auriemma announces new restaurant

University of Connecticut women’s basketball coach Geno Auriemma speaks at a press conference April 10, 2012 announcing a plan to open a new restaurant in the Storrs Center development. Photo by Roxanne Pandolfi

When the $220 million Storrs Center opens its first businesses this summer, a familiar name will be attached to one of the restaurants.

During a press conference at the Nathan Hale Inn and Conference Center on the UConn campus Tuesday afternoon, UConn women’s basketball head coach Geno Auriemma announced he will open an Italian/ American restaurant in the complex, tentatively called Geno’s Grille.

Crediting the work of various individuals and organizations involved with the project, Auriemma said his role is simply to attach his celebrity name to the project.

Auriemma has coached seven championship teams and made it to 13 Final Fours. “I’m kind of like the Queen of England, you know,” he said. “They paraded me out there. I don’t do any of the work.”

The hope is his name will attract people from across the state to Storrs Center, and help make it a hot destination for current students, graduates and other Connecticut residents.

It was an exciting moment for Mansfield Mayor Betsy Paterson, who serves as an ex-officio member of the Mansfield Downtown Partnership Board of Directors, the group overseeing the project.

“We know you (Auriemma) will be successful in this venture,” said Paterson. “This will be the place to be in Storrs Center.”

Construction on the restaurant is expected to begin in May and it is expected to open around Labor Day, as part of the first phase of the development.

It will seat more than 100 people and have a bar and an outside dining area.

The Storrs Center location is the second restaurant opened by Auriemma and his partners, who also own and operate Geno’s Fast Break restaurant at Mohegan Sun casino.

The new restaurant will serve a variety of appetizers, entrees and desserts prepared by chef Calvin Silva.

Auriemma said only food he likes to eat, such as pizza, pasta and sandwiches will be served. “Other than my mother’s food, it will be as good as you can get,” he said.

Those who attended the press conference got a taste of the food Geno’s will offer, as a variety of wraps and other foods from Fast Break were served.

Auriemma’s restaurant is the latest of many businesses to sign on to Storrs Center, a development project that will bring a retail, commercial and residential components to the town.

According to Howard Kaufman, managing member of Leyland Alliance, the master developer on the project, approximately 80 percent of the commercial leases have been signed for the first phase of the project. This includes Moe’s Southwest Grill, Husky Pizza, Fro-yo World (frozen yogurt) and Insomnia Cookies. Some existing businesses also have signed letters of intent, including Storrs Automotive.

The UConn Co-op bookstore is expected to sign a lease to set up a second business in Mansfield. And talks are underway with three more businesses, Kaufman said.

“We’re well on our way to becoming fully leased by the time the project opens up,” he said.

Posted April 11, 2012 as edited by HTNP.com Editor Brenda Sullivan

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Hebron Maple Festival is this weekend

The chainsaw carving demonstration by the Shack Out Back is one of the more popular events at the Hebron Maple Festival, held this year on March 10-11 2012. Photo source: Hebron Maple Festival

The sweet tastes, smells and sights of the Hebron Maple Festival will return again this weekend.

Now in its 22nd year, the festival truly encompasses the entire town, not just in participation but in layout and the popular event draws thousands of visitors from all over the state – and even out of state – as well.

Those in the know arrive early, especially if you want to buy maple syrup at the sugar houses.

The 2012 Hebron Maple Fest will be held Saturday and Sunday, March 10 and 11.

Hebron is home to several maple sugar houses, where activities and self-guided tours are planned, but many of Hebron’s businesses and non-profit organizations also take part in the two-day schedule of events.

Some events are held at stores, churches and town facilities, and others are set up at booths along Main Street.

A full listing of events, contests, giveaways, demonstrations, special breakfasts, a downloadable copy of the brochure in PDF format (including a map), and so much more, is available on the Maple Fest web site at www.hebronmaplefest.com

Participating sugarhouses include: Woody Acres, 80 Cone Road; Pierce’s Sugar House, 325 W. Main St.; and Wenzel’s Sugar House, 522 East St. This year also features a new sugar house, Hill’s House on Route 85. All will be open for tours and demonstrations.

As well as tours, exhibits and activities, all things maple will be offered for the public.

These range from the Hebron Historical Society’s sale of maple milk at the Old Town Hall to the Hebron Volunteer Fire Department’s popular sugar on snow and the Hebron Interfaith Human Services’ maple cotton candy at Hebron Fire Company No. 1.

Of course, maple syrup will be offered, well, everywhere.

Ron Wenzel, owner of Wenzel’s Sugar House, said the mild winter hasn’t affected his operation.

“The snow that we had last year was just right,” he said, but, “the sap production for me is about the same as a normal year, 50 to 60 gallons of syrup.”

Making that amount of syrup means Wenzel collected at least 3,300 gallons of sap from the trees he’s tapped around his property.

All the sappy goodness will be available for personal analysis and comparison at the festival.

There also will be all the traditional festival fare – fried dough, hot dogs and hamburgers, kettlecorn and more.

Opening ceremonies on Saturday begin at 9:45 a.m. at Liberty Square Collectibles at 105 Main St.

A variety of events are planned for 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

For example, he nonprofit organization Wingmasters will exhibit birds of prey both days at the AHM Youth Services building at 25 Pendleton Drive, to benefit the family programs.

And the Hebron Historical Society will host the annual, very popular Quilt Show at the Old Town Hall on both days. Donations are requested to view the quilt exhibit to benefit historical society programs.

The Farmer’s Cow – a cooperative of six dairy farms from eastern Connecticut producing milk, cream, ice-cream, eggs and other products for local grocery stores – will share a booth at the Maple Fest with the Hebron Historical Society.

Adjacent to Old Town Hall will be a truck from Farmer’s Cow, which will serve ice cream samples and accept donations to benefit the town’s land acquisition fund, which is used to preserve open space.

One of the six farms in the cooperative is Maple Leaf Farm of Hebron, owned by the Ellis family.

This is the second year that representatives from the Farmer’s Cow have sponsored a booth at the Maple Festival.

“The society is pleased to support Farmer’s Cow in honor of Hebron’s long history of dairy farming,” said Hebron Historical Society President Donna McCalla.

She added, “We want to make sure that residents and visitors know that any volunteer donations will directly benefit the Hebron Open Space Land Acquisition Fund.”

Posted March 9, 2012 as edited and added to by HTNP.com Editor Brenda Sullivan

Have a news item, event or Letter to the Editor you’d like posted on this news site? Simply send your information to editor@htnp.com and include your town in the subject line of your email. Please also include a phone number where you can be reached if there are questions. To keep up-to-date on local news, “like” us (HTNP News) on Facebook and follow us ( @HTNP) on Twitter!

Out and about in the Quiet Corner this weekend

The forecast for this weekend is warm if not a bit windy, but a great couple of days to get out and enjoy some fresh air. Please also see a separate story about the Hebron Maple Festival, on Saturday and Sunday, March 10-11.

Saturday March 10

KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS PANCAKE BREAKFAST

The Knights of Columbus, Council No. 11835, will host a Hebron Maple Festival pancake breakfast from 7:30 to 11:30 a.m. at the Church of the Holy Family parish hall (185 Church St.). Cost is $7 adults, $5 children (under 12). Info: T. J. McGuire (860) 228-1618.

NURSERY SCHOOL OPEN HOUSE

The Lebanon Cooperative Nursery School will host an open house from 9 a.m. to noon. Come and view the school, meet the teachers, and speak with current parents/board members. Info: www.lebanoncoop.org or call (860) 642-7719.

LAUGHTER YOGA

The Saxton B. Little Free Library, Columbia, will host Laughter Yoga with Laura Li at 10 a.m. at Yeoman’s Hall, Route 87, Columbia. Bring a water bottle and wear comfortable clothes and shoes. No yoga mats required. However, registration is required at ckubala@columbiactlibrary.org or (860) 228-0350.

HEBRON MAPLE FEST POLISH DINNER

St. Peter’s Church will hold a Polish dinner in Phelp’s Hall, 30 Church St. (Route 85), Hebron from 2:30 to 6 p.m. Cost is $12 adults, $6, 12 and under (under 6 is free). Info: (860) 228-3244 or visit the church web site at www.StPetersHebron.com

Sunday March 11

THE “MAGIC SCHOOL BUS” COMES TO JORGENSEN

Jorgensen Center for Performing Arts, 2132 Hillside Road, Storrs-Mansfield (on the UConn campus), will host two matinees at 1 and 3 p.m. of the Magic School Bus. Adults $13, children $11. Information/tickets: call the box office at (860) 486-4226 or order online at jorgensen.uconn.edu

COMMUNITY FARM PRESERVATION PROGRAM

The Ashford Grange will host an informative program with Agriculture Commissioner Steven K. Reviczky, who will talk about the new Community Farm Preservation Program. The program will be held at Knowlton Hall, Route 44, Warrenville (Ashford), at 3 p.m. The Ashford Grange will precede the program with a potluck lunch at 12:30 and a short business meeting at 2 p. m. All are welcome.

LENTEN VESPERS

Holy Trinity Orthodox Church, 414 Valley St., Willimantic, will host the Connecticut Deanery for Lenten Vespers at 4 p.m. The public is invited.

VENDORS WANTED — FLEA MARKET

Cedar Hill Market Place, 828 Route 32, Franklin, invites vendors for a flea market to be held on March 24 from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Info: (860) 642-1899.

And coming up this week…

Monday March 12

ORGANIC GARDENING WORKSHOP

The Columbia Conservation and Agriculture Commission will spon­sor an organic gardening workshop led by Bryan O’Hara at 3 p.m. in Yeoman’s Hall, 323 Route 87, Columbia. Come learn about natural ways to enhance your gardening experience. Free to the public. Info: (860) 228-0440 or e-mail lmcdonald@columbiact.org

WINDHAM THEATRE GUILD AUDITIONS

The Windham Theatre Guild will hold open auditions for the comedy “Blithe Spirit” by Noel Coward at Windham Middle School, Quarry Street, Willimantic, at 7 p. m. Info: Director Victor Funderburk at ( 860) 450-6419 or visit windhamtheatreguild.org

SECOND MONDAY SOCIAL ACTION FILM SERIES

Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Storrs, 46 Spring Hill Road, Storrs-Mansfield, will present “Flow: For the Love of Water” at 7 p.m. Info: (860) 423-6727.

Tuesday March 13

STORYTIME

The Douglas Library, 2 Main St., Hebron, will host a story time for children aged 2 and 3 years old at 10 a.m. Info: call the library’s children’s department at (860) 228-9312, ext. 3.

TOWN-GOWN MEETING — ECSU

The community is invited to join Eastern Connecticut State University staff, Windham town officials, students and neighbors to discuss issues of interest and concern in the community from 6 to 7:30 p.m., Johnson Room 204, ECSU Eugene Smith Library. All are welcome. Info: visit http://www.easternct.edu/towngown

BOOK DISCUSSION

The Saxton B. Little Free Library, Columbia, hosts a book discussion of “A Secret Kept” by Tatiana de Rosnay at 7 p. m. Book highlights com­plex family relationships and how the power of a past secret threatens to change everything in the present. Books provided by the library, all welcome. Info: (860) 228-0350 or ckubala@columbiactlibrary.org

QUIET CORNER FIDDLERS

The Quiet Corner Fiddlers will perform at Fred’s Brick House Café, 1681 Main St., Willimantic, from 7 to 8:30 p.m. New fiddlers are always welcom to join in. Info: (860) 423-5403 or (860) 742-1547.

Wednesday March 14

INTERFAITH SEWING AND SERVICE GROUP

First Congregational Church, 199 Valley St., Willimantic, 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Projects: CWS — schools bags and layettes, Haiti maternity dresses. Snow date: March 15. Info: (860) 228-9658.

HOSPICE HOSPITALITY LUNCHEON

Hospice of Eastern Connecticut will hold its hospitality luncheon at Pine Acres Restaurant, Route 6, Chaplin, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Social gathering of people who are successfully moving on with their lives after a loss. Open to the community. (860) 456-7288 ext. 293 for further information.

RED CROSS BLOOD DRIVE

The Red Cross will host a blood drive at the Lebanon Fire Safety Complex, 23 Goshen Hill Road, Lebanon, from 1 to 5:45 p.m. Info: (800) 733-2767 or www.redcrossblood.org Sponsored by Lebanon Lions Club. (Also see separate story in Mansfield Today about March is Blood Donor month)

MARCH MADNESS MOVIE

Mansfield Senior Center, 303 Maple Road, Storrs-Mansfield, CT will host a March Madness movie, “Hoosiers” at 1 p.m.

Posted March 10, 2012

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Will Gov Malloy’s education ‘reforms’ hurt small towns?

Rep. Sawyer said towns like Andover are doing everything they can to help their schools. “The town is willing to put so much time and money into their schools,” said Sawyer. “Why would you then penalize them for their hard work?” Under the governor’s proposal, school districts that meet the criteria but fail to regionalize would lose 10 percent of their state aid the first year, with 10 percent increments each year up, to a maximum loss of 50 percent by the fifth year.

Andover officials are worried about the negative impact Gov. Dannel P. Malloy’s education reform bill may have on the town.

The governor wants to regionalize school districts with populations under 1,000 students, and those where per-pupil expenditure exceeds the state per-pupil average, effective the 2015-16 fiscal year.

Thirty-one of the state’s school districts could be affected including regional school districts in Scotland, Hampton, Chaplin, Franklin, Columbia and Willington.

Andover is also on that list — with a catch.

Andover’s per pupil spending, which was $12,282 in fiscal year 2011, isn’t in excess of the state per-pupil average.

But Andover Superintendent Andrew Maneggia is still concerned.

“I’m worried about a lot of the legislation at this time,” Maneggia said. He added that he is most worried about the possible regionalization of Andover Elementary School.

Andover, which was regionalized with Hebron and Marlborough several years ago, currently isn’t and Maneggia says he knows it doesn’t work for the younger schoolchildren.

“We went through (regionalization),” said Maneggia. “As far as the regionalizing of grades 7 through 12, it makes sense, but at this level it doesn’t.”

State Rep. Pam Sawyer – whose district includes Hebron, Andover and Marlborough – said she “highly disagrees” with the proposed legislation.

“They used to have four different elementary schools (in three towns),” Sawyer said and recalled that the single superintendent responsible for the district couldn’t focus on every school. “Since they have broken off, every town’s scores have gone straight up. They are all doing very well now.”

Under the governor’s proposal, school districts that meet the criteria but fail to regionalize would lose 10 percent of their state aid the first year, with 10 percent increments each year up, to a maximum loss of 50 percent by the fifth year.

Currently, the state sends $78.8 million each year to the 49 towns with fewer than 1,000 students that don’t spend above the amount the state deems acceptable. (There are more towns than districts because some towns fall below Malloy’s criteria even though they already belong to regional districts.)

Andover received $3,057,025 in fiscal year 2011 and would lose more than $300,000 if it were to be penalized.

Sawyer said she knows Andover currently wouldn’t be affected by the legislation, but is still worried. “It doesn’t mean they won’t in the future,” she said “One of the concerns I have is that it penalizes school systems that are doing well.”

Sawyer said she sees Malloy’s plan as “counterproductive.”

“Why would you want to disrupt success?” asked Sawyer. “Why would you do that? Especially when the focus should be on the larger schools that have the greatest failure rate.”

Sawyer pointed out that the smaller districts only have personal property taxes to fund the schools. “These schools don’t have the support that help fund education like the bigger, more commercialized towns and cities do,” said Sawyer.

“I believe it is essential that we look for state support of education that is balanced and balances out the tax structure somewhat,” she said.

Sawyer said towns like Andover are doing everything they can to help their schools. “The town is willing to put so much time and money into their schools,” said Sawyer. “Why would you then penalize them for their hard work?”

Sawyer, who has been visiting teachers in all of her towns, said this session is going to be “very interesting.”

“Not only does every legislator have a school, every legislator went to school and many have children that are still in school,” said Sawyer. “How does this plan help the children?”

Maneggia said there still needs to be “a lot of discussion” about all of Malloy’s education reform proposals.

“(Malloy) is approaching it the wrong way,” said Maneggia. “It would be better off saying we have these benefits that you can gain rather than penalizing towns financially.”

Posted March 7, 2012 as edited by HTNP.com Editor Brenda Sullivan

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High winds could cause damage, outages in parts of Connecticut

February 24, 2012 Areawide, Local News No Comments

Gov. Malloy will open the state's Emergency Operations Center Saturday morning, Feb. 25, to respond to any emergencies resulting from high winds, forecast to reach as much as 48 mph. Photo source: NOAA gov web site, shows effects of a "macroburst" in 2006

Gov. Dannel P. Malloy announced today that he will partially activate the state’s Emergency Operations Center (EOC) at 8 a.m. Saturday (Feb. 25) to respond to any emergencies that might arise as a result of high winds forecast for tonight and early Saturday.

Currently, a High Wind Warning has been issued for Windham, New London and Southern Middlesex Counties for overnight. The strongest winds expected after daybreak tomorrow.

A High Wind Warning is issued for forecasts of sustained wind speeds of at least 40 mph and gusts possibly in excess of 58 mph.

A less serious alert, a Wind Advisory, has been issued for the rest of the state.

The EOC will be staffed by the Division of Emergency Management and Homeland Security, Division of the State Police, Department of Public Health, Department of Transportation, Military Department, Department of Energy and Environmental Protection, State Fire Coordination, and the state’s utilities.

Posted Feb. 24, 2012

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Shamrockin Bowl!

Please join us on St. Patrick’s Day, March 17, 2012 for some duck pin bowling. Have fun and raise funds for local children's summer camp scholarships! All proceeds will go to AHM Youth and Family Services and Hebron Parks and Recreation Scholarship Funds.

Please join us on St. Patrick’s Day, March 17, 2012 for some duck pin bowling. Have fun and raise funds for local children’s summer camp scholarships!

There will be music, glow lights and all who attend will have a chance to win a Nook Color.

All proceeds will go to AHM Youth and Family Services and Hebron Parks and Recreation Scholarship Funds.  AHM provides services to the towns of Andover, Columbia, Hebron (Amston) and Marlborough.

The event will be held at the Holiday Lanes in Manchester, CT at various time slots between 10 a.m. and 6 p.m.

Tickets are $15 for individuals or $45 for a team of four and are being sold at AHM Youth Services, 25 Pendelton Drive in Hebron as well as the Hebron Parks & Recreation Office at Burnt Hill Park, and the Gilead Congregational Church during office hours.

Questions? Please call the Gilead Church at (860) 228-3077 or visit The Gilead Congregational Church Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/GCCBoardofMissions

Posted Feb. 23, 2012

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Church of the Holy Family offers fish dinners for Lenten season

February 22, 2012 Local News No Comments

Church of the Holy Family in Hebron, CT will offer fish dinners on all Fridays beginning Feb. 24 through March 30, 2012.

The Church of the Holy Family, 185 Church St., Hebron will offer a sit-down, Lenten fish fry for the community on Ash Wednesday (Feb. 22) from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. and on all Fridays beginning Feb. 24 through March 30 from 5 to 7:30 p.m. and on Good Friday, April 6, from 4 to 7:30 p.m.

Cost is $12.50 for adults, $10 for seniors (age 65 and over) and $6 for kids (age 10 and under).

Take-out meals are also available.

The menu will include fresh fish (baked, fried or a combination), french fries, and homemade coleslaw. A children’s menu will feature macaroni & cheese and/or fries/cole slaw and fish. Also included, a weekly dessert special for the adults, cupcakes for the kids and a sugar-free dessert option.

Stations of the Cross will be held upstairs in the Church every Friday during Lent at 7:30 p.m. for those who are interested.

Questions? Call (860) 228-0096.

The Church of the Holy Family serves the communities of Hebron, Andover, Marlborough, and Columbia, CT. For more information on programs and services at the Church of the Holy Family, contact the parish at 860-228-0096 or online at www.holyfamilyhebron.org

Posted Feb. 22, 2012

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Local day camps made a great summer for cancer patients families

CHILDREN RUNNING from Windham Hosp FB page

In addition, the Town of Coventry Parks and Recreation Camp and Camp Asto Wamah in Columbia, CT each offered free spaces for children of cancer patients.

Connecticut budget ends with $359 million surplus

Ben Barnes CT Budget Director

Personal income tax receipts were up $55.1 million over last month. The corporation tax also was revised upward by $15 million.

Future of local water supply is topic of public forum July 29

A forum focused on our water supply – including who decides how it’s used – will be hosted by The League of Women Voters of Northeastern Connecticut (formerly the League of Women Voters of Mansfield) and the Connecticut Institute of Water Resources (CIWR) on Monday, July 29 from 7-9 p.m. at the Elks Lodge (lower level), located at 198 Pleasant St. in Willimantic.

Questions about water sources, usage and quality have come into focus recently in light of the Storrs Center development, UConn’s plans to bring in water to support a new Tech Park and the concurrent needs of the towns in this region, particularly in terms of their own development plans.

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